Leveling Your Tiny House Trailer

Last week of March when the weather broke we leveled our tiny house. Below is what we did and some general guidelines to follow when leveling your tiny house trailer…

We did not have the luxury to park our tiny house trailer on level ground or pavement.  If the ground is even remotely unlevel, your equalizers (the yokes that attach between wheels and have the leaf springs) are going to pivot wildly as they’re meant to operate with a heavy load on your trailer. To stabilize the equalizers and have a level surface for building, you can use pressure treated lumber to fit under your wheel wells; you don’t want your wheels to eventually sink in a soft surface once bearing weight.  In our case, we used two 10’ boards for one wheel well & three on another:

wheel wells leveled

We didn’t want to have our tiny house sitting too high off the ground before it needs to move, so we staggered the boards to make the transition easier.  Hopefully your ground is more level than ours where you won’t need so many:

staggered walkway

We determined if the trailer was level using a 48” level.  In this case, the larger the better to account for any abnormalities in your trailer frame.  If you have access to a 72” level, this would be even more helpful.  We didn’t but the 48” level worked just fine.

truck attached to trailer with level
We leveled our trailer while still hitched to a vehicle. On trailer a 48″ level (this size or larger recommended).

We used your standard floor jack for raising/lowering the trailer, and did this with the trailer still hitched to a vehicle.  We placed the jack on wood blocks and used an additional wood block on the saddle to get the height we need:

hydraulic jack with blocking 1

If you plan to use scissor jacks or if your trailer came with attached scissor jacks (like ours), do not fully extend them; these are not meant to bear weight for long periods of time. We placed patio stones at the base of each scissor jack, and additional concrete blocks where necessary. For concrete blocks, keep in mind these easily break & crumble, so the “reinforced” (as opposed to lightweight) core ones would probably hold weight better.

scissor jack not fully extended stone block

Under the patio blocks we used a combination of gravel & sand to level them the way we wanted. Just add/move or take away gravel to get the blocks sitting the way you need.

gravel sand sand to create smooth surface for stone block

 

 

 

Support your hitch jack as well, and raise or lower to where you need. Ours was removable and we did this step last. I recommend getting the rest of your trailer level as much as possible so you don’t need to rely too much on using the hitch to fix your pitch (hey, that rhymed!).

019

Finally, even though your trailer likely isn’t going anywhere fast, chock the back of your wheels- just in case!

chock behind wheels

A leveled tiny house trailer ready to build! If you have any questions about what we did, feel free to post below.

Leveled tiny house trailer on pressure treated wood and stone blocks, with additional support from scissor jacks. Some tiny house users will also use bottle jacks and/or a floor jack on site.
Leveled tiny house trailer on pressure treated wood and stone blocks, with additional support from scissor jacks. Some tiny house users will also use bottle jacks and/or a floor jack on site.

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